The Future

When wine meets tech, the possibilities are endless
From label-to-door deliveries to a platform that treats your palate like a dating profile, the latest entrepreneurial renaissance is adding a little tech to those tannins.
Jaron Lanier's new book warns against the siren song of Internet megasites...

Jaron Lanier has written a remarkable book that stands as a landmark in the emerging debate about the social consequences of Internet technology. Who Owns the Future? (Simon & Schuster) is both a radical critique of the trend toward concentration of economic power in a small number of Internet ventures and a passionate call for the development of a humanistic digital society. The word humanistic is seldom heard from the movers and shakers of Silicon Valley or their financial backers, but it is at the heart of Lanier’s argument. Instead of talking about bandwidth, page hits, advertising impressions, and market share as the...

Take that joy ride now... That is if you can find an open road.
Detroit filed for bankruptcy on July 18, 2013. That raises a bigger question, can we really believe that the auto industry, as currently configured, can survive longterm?
Looking for exotic career options? The Mars One Mission may have room for you. But heed Haig Hovaness's warnings.

How would you like to die on Mars? For a surprising number of people this is not an unappealing prospect.  So strong is the desire for interplanetary adventure that a private company, Mars One, is now planning a venture that will offer one-way trips to the Red Planet. Selected volunteers would commit to living the remainder of their lives on Mars. As of April, 2013, the company had received over 10,000 inquires from wannabe astronauts whose dream of visiting Mars is powerful enough to overcome  the quite serious concerns of survival. Unfortunately, the outcome of this adventure is likely to...

Haig Hovaness considers Smartphones and the Future of Photography

The picture below is my Leica IIIC, a camera that was manufactured in 1950, the year I was born. At the time it was first sold, it cost the equivalent of $3,000 in inflation-adjusted dollars. It is an entirely mechanical camera – no auto anything. With fine-grained film, it will produce a 35mm film image that can match the output of a 20-megapixel digital camera sensor. It is difficult to load, slow to rewind, and has a squinty little viewfinder, but it is a glorious artifact. The elegant contours, the satin chrome finish, and the silky-smooth film winding action and shutter release all whisper timeless quality.

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Recapture the real mood of the moment with this awesome Photo App for your desktop

I’ve basically been a Photoshop hack for 20 years.  Love the program, for sure.  But last year I found myself falling for the new iPhone app Instagram - which performs a range of instantaneous effect morphs on any shot you snap with your iPhone or Android. You can pull a photo out of the mundane and into any number of time warped finishes with names like Sutro, Lo-Fi, Nashville and 1977.  Then you can post your groovy new altered images to Instagram's social blog  - all viewable on your phone. I was originally charmed by the visual appeal of what I found there. However, Facebook's recent billion dollar buy out of Instagram has...

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